I Finished My Work at 8a, What are You Doing?

By 8a this morning I had met my reading goal, completed a section of my online class, fit in a short workout, met my daily writing goal, and enjoyed a lovely smoked gouda and sausage breakfast casserole. And now I am writing you this post. I have the rest of the day to complete chores, work on other parts of my business, and cook dinner to enjoy with my fiance.

Of course, the thing not immediately seen in my account of my morning is the preparation involved. I was up early because I began my nightly wind down at 9p – shutting off devices, prepping my coffee, and quieting my mind. I have spent countless hours attempting to understand what activities will prepare me to be the best writer I can be, and countless more working out a schedule that mimics the flow of my energy.  I also make breakfast casseroles and lunches on Sundays and group together my clothes for the week.

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Since I embarked on the life of a small business owner, I have come to understand some days will be like this, but many will not. It is important to seize upon those moments that can help you advance your goals whenever they present themselves. For me, preparation has been an essential component in helping me meet the demands of the self-employed lifestyle. This includes a weekly schedule, pre-preparing a menu, a workflow schedule, project management software, and daily reading and writing goals.

Do you have any tips to share?

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Quartz – Google gives answers but deprives us of intelligence

Search engines play one of the most significant roles in our technologically enabled lives by shaping how we conceptualize and interact with information, knowledge, wisdom, and arguably reality itself. They are our externalized reasoning machines, both facilitating our access to knowledge and quickly becoming our knowledge. They are where we go to research, clarify, and…

via Googling gives us answers—but deprives us of intelligence — Quartz

I think this where the importance of teaching our children how to look things up the “old fashioned” way becomes critical to developing a critical thought process.  I was very lucky to grow up in a “look it up” household right before the dawn of giants like Google.   Whenever I asked my family a question, they told me to look it up.  I had to learn how to use an Encyclopedia and a dictionary.  I also had to learn how to work the Dewey Decimal system and reference rooms at the local library.

By the time that search engines became a thing, they made my work easier for sure. Number one, because it was right at my fingertips, number two because I developed the critical thinking skills necessary to form my own opinion based on what was being offered up.

What do you think? Should youth learn how to access material the “old-fashioned” way?  Or are those days long behind us?

-Brandi