I Finished My Work at 8a, What are You Doing?

By 8a this morning I had met my reading goal, completed a section of my online class, fit in a short workout, met my daily writing goal, and enjoyed a lovely smoked gouda and sausage breakfast casserole. And now I am writing you this post. I have the rest of the day to complete chores, work on other parts of my business, and cook dinner to enjoy with my fiance.

Of course, the thing not immediately seen in my account of my morning is the preparation involved. I was up early because I began my nightly wind down at 9p – shutting off devices, prepping my coffee, and quieting my mind. I have spent countless hours attempting to understand what activities will prepare me to be the best writer I can be, and countless more working out a schedule that mimics the flow of my energy.  I also make breakfast casseroles and lunches on Sundays and group together my clothes for the week.

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Since I embarked on the life of a small business owner, I have come to understand some days will be like this, but many will not. It is important to seize upon those moments that can help you advance your goals whenever they present themselves. For me, preparation has been an essential component in helping me meet the demands of the self-employed lifestyle. This includes a weekly schedule, pre-preparing a menu, a workflow schedule, project management software, and daily reading and writing goals.

Do you have any tips to share?

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You are Wearing That??

https://brandiholder1.wordpress.com

Recently a colleague approached me to discuss office dress code and what she perceived to be violations of the dress code by interns. This got me thinking about a couple things.

One, did the organization have a written dress code? As a volunteer myself I am not a regular office member, but I am subject to all of the department policies. In the volumes of reading material I encountered during my first week, I do not remember seeing a dress code. So if there is no formal written document, it begs the question, whose dress code?

Which leads me to thought number two. While we were having the conversation, it occurred to me that the interns most likely never held a professional role or title. They may not know what workplace culture is, or they may not have a professional role model to look to for cues on what is appropriate for the workplace. These ladies were not dressed inappropriately, but perhaps inappropriately for the conservative environment for which they are working. The primary concern of the office member was that the intern’s shorts were too short.

So who has the responsibility to teach young people about workplace dress and culture?  It is certainly not happening in the schools. At the graduate level, I watched fellow classmates give presentations in sweatpants, wrinkled t-shirts, and ripped jeans.

For me, acceptable workplace items include knee length skirts, button down blouses with sleeves, and trousers.  I do not think that sleeveless or low-cut shirts, short skirts, yoga pants, or shorts belong in the work environment.  Jeans are acceptable depending on the office – but leave your sparkle booty jeans at home.

You should feel confident in your office attire, and it should be something that is not distracting to you or your colleagues.

Does that make me old school? Perhaps! But isn’t it better to remove any distractions that could overshadow your accomplishments?

What do you think?

 

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Unconscious Bias in the Workplace

The Leadership Insiders network is an online community where the most thoughtful and influential people in business contribute answers to timely questions about careers and leadership. Today’s answer to the question, “How can you play a role in advancing workplace equality?” is written by Dennis Yang, CEO of Udemy. There’s been plenty of talk about…

via How Unconscious Bias Is Holding Your Company Back — Fortune

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Local Entrepreneurs Rise to the Occasion and Share the Ride

As written for iluvlocalplaces.com 10/2016

Unless you have been living under a rock for the past couple of years, you have no doubt heard of rideshare services such as Uber and Lyft.  What you may not know is that Cape Girardeau is poised to get its very own version by the name of carGO.  The ride share service is designed to work in micropolitan, or hometown markets, where people are more likely to know each other.  Up until now, this is a market untapped by larger rideshare companies as they tend to focus on larger cities.

I recently sat down with carGO business managers, Gunnar Knudtson and  Kyle Campbell, to get the scoop on their exciting new venture.   James Stapleton of Codefi and Jeffrey Maurer of Mayson Capital Partners of Cape Girardeau spearheaded the micropolitan rideshare concept.  The service is designed to be an on-demand ride service similar to those in the larger markets.  A major defining feature of carGO is the ability to request a ride from your smartphone – connecting you with background checked and safety trained drivers.  A further defining feature specific to carGO is the ability to “favorite” and request particular drivers or be matched with nearby drivers.

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L to R, Maurer, Stapleton, Campbell, Knudtson

When I asked Gunnar and Kyle why this particular business, they said an opportunity like this right out of college was not something they could walk away from.  Both Gunnar and Kyle were studying business at the University of Mississippi, and both had no plans to come back to Cape.  But as we all know, life is funny that way.  Gunner explained the pair received a call one day indicating Stapleton and Maurer wanted to meet and discuss the business idea over dinner.  Gunner recalls with a laugh, “that meeting lasted over four hours.”  He said they felt like they were on “cloud nine” afterward, recognizing that they had an incredible opportunity in front of them.  Although the pair has a background in business management and interest in starting a business, neither has experience launching a tech-infused start-up.

Gunnar and Kyle immediately took up residence in the Codefi co-working space in the Federal Building and started the grind.  Although the business idea was already in place, the pair would have to create processes and finalize details.  This meant partnership agreements, working with the app development, logistics, and a host of legalities and marketing issues related to locating drivers and riders.  Then there is the fact that the service has never been tried in the Cape area.  No pressure guys.  Gunnar and Kyle both express sincere gratitude to the folks at Codefi (https://www.codefiworks.com/) and for the way the up and coming Tech District have nurtured the process.

When asked what success looks like for the new venture Kyle said, “getting that first ride requested and completed.” As the pair laugh, Gunnar chimes in saying that he is hopeful for “future expansion into multiple markets” as the long-term indicator of success.  Both gentlemen agree that the experience is going to be a great learning experience.

 

Notables

The carGO app and website are currently under development.  Potential drivers and riders can visit the site http://www.gocargo.io/ to sign up for more information.

carGO headquarters will be located in the Marquette Tower Tech District.